Upgrade Completed Successfully

Update your shit!
After recently reading several horror stories about websites and blogs being hacked simply because they were running outdated versions of their CMS or WordPress, I decided to upgrade – EVERYTHING. The server, the blog, the website – even my “back burner” website.

Up until the last few weeks I’ve always taken the “if it aint broke, don’t fix it” attitude. Partially because I’m lazy, and partially because I’m paranoid that something will break if I try to upgrade it. But after weighing the options I decided that if something was going to break I would rather break it on my schedule and not some Turkish hacker or script-kiddie’s schedule.

I started a couple of months ago by upgrading the site to the Drupal 5.x. I then upgraded a few things on the server and added some additional security related items (sorry, no details), and I also upgraded my other site to Drupal 5. Finally, today I topp’d it all off by upgrading my WordPress. Even though virtually all of these mini-projects were learning experiences for me they all went 99% smooth – even the scariest part, re-compiling Apache on my server. Seems that all this time I’ve been living dangerously for no real reason.

So I’ve turned-over a new leaf and will now try to keep everything current – maybe not to the newest version of everything (no Drupal 6 or 7 just yet), but at least to supported versions. I’ve even started using a nifty Drupal module called Update Status which notifies me any time a Drupal module has an update available.

If you’re like me (lazy or afraid to break things) you might want to consider doing a few upgrades – especially if there are known vulnerabilities in old versions that you’re using. Remember – would you rather break something yourself, or have someone break it for you?

What about you? Do you always upgrade to the latest and greatest, to the current “stable”/supported version – or do you just sit back and hope nothing bad happens?

7 thoughts on “Upgrade Completed Successfully

  1. I am surprised that your host won’t handle some of the basic security upgrades for you. Did you find that you needed to do stuff that they wouldn’t do (like recompile Apache — yuck).

    thanks,
    Mark

  2. [quote comment=”2101″]I am surprised that your host won’t handle some of the basic security upgrades for you. Did you find that you needed to do stuff that they wouldn’t do (like recompile Apache — yuck).
    [/quote]

    Having a dedicated (“MY”) server, i’m supposed to know how to do these things myself. My host, SurpassHosting would make the changes for me if i asked, but they would do it on “their” schedule – and i’m always paranoid that something will break and I wont be able to get ahold of someone to fix it, etc.. besides, if they did everything for me, i’d never learn anything.

  3. I believe you must feel a lot more safe and relaxed as a result of the upgrade. With an own box at home, or dedicated, it’s best not to postpone updates, upgrades or make at least daily full back ups, so if things don’t work out everything can be restored quickly. Guys just upgraded our server at work, MYSQL, Centos, and Appache server they did to the latest stable versions. And so I did my wordpress with a couple of plugins I’ve been using.

  4. [quote comment=”2102″]besides, if they did everything for me, i’d never learn anything.[/quote]

    Now that sounds familiar!

    I don’t mind upgrading things like my yahoo messenger, or my WP plugins that just require a 1-click to upgrade…. But I haven’t gotten around to upgrading to the latest version of WP.

  5. WordPress is really easy to upgrade to the latest versions if you got the automatic WordPress upgrade plugin. If you have bunch of different blogs that run on WordPress then this is a plugin for you. I usually upgrade WordPress to the latest when it comes out. It is better for me to break my blog then have someone else break it. Greg Ellison

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